Other Resources

Below you will find a wide array of interesting and educational links that we feel will benefit your understanding and knowledge of your dental health. If you have a suggestion for a link that you feel would be of interest, please feel free to email it to us so we can share it with all of our patients.

Air Abrasion
Air abrasion is a drill-less technique that is being used by some dentists to remove tooth decay and for other applications.
How Does Air Abrasion Work? Read more
Anesthesia

Anesthesia is a way to control pain during a surgery or procedure by using medicines called anesthetics. It can help control your breathing, blood pressure, blood flow, and heart rate and rhythm.

What are the types of anesthesia? Read more

Bad Breath

Bad breath, medically called halitosis, can result from poor dental health habits and may be a sign of other health problems. Bad breath can also be made worse by the types of foods you eat and other unhealthy lifestyle habits.

Why Do Poor Habits Cause Bad Breath? Read more

Braces
Braces, wires, springs, rubber bands, and other appliances can attract food and plaque, which can stain teeth if not brushed away. Most orthodontists recommend brushing after every meal or snack with fluoride toothpaste and carefully removing any food that may have gotten stuck in your braces. Some orthodontists will also prescribe or recommend a fluoride mouthwash, which can get into places in the mouth that a toothbrush can't reach.
Flossing & Brushing Tips With Braces Read more
Bridges
Dental bridges literally bridge the gap created by one or more missing teeth.

A bridge is made up of two crowns for the teeth on either side of the gap -- these two anchoring teeth are called abutment teeth -- and a false tooth/teeth in between. These false teeth are called pontics and can be made from gold, alloys, porcelain, or a combination of these materials. Dental bridges are supported by natural teeth or implants.
What Are the Benefits of Dental Bridges? Read more

Bruxism
Most people probably grind and clench their teeth from time to time. Occasional teeth grinding, medically called bruxism, does not usually cause harm, but when teeth grinding occurs on a regular basis the teeth can be damaged and other oral health complications can arise.
Why Do People Grind Their Teeth? Read more
Canker Sores
Canker sores are small, shallow ulcers that appear in the mouth and often make eating and talking uncomfortable. There are two types of canker sores:
What Causes Canker Sores? Read more
Composites & Bonding
Valuable information about silver fillings, composites, ceramics and much more.
Want to know more about Tooth Fillings? Read more
Crowns
A dental crown is a tooth-shaped "cap" that is placed over a tooth -- to cover the tooth to restore its shape and size, strength, and improve its appearance.
Why Is a Dental Crown Needed? Read more
Digital X-Rays
There are two main types of dental X-rays: intraoral (meaning the X-ray film is inside the mouth) and extraoral (meaning the X-ray film is outside the mouth).
Types of Intraoral X-Rays Read more
Extractions
An oral and maxillofacial surgeon or your dentist can remove (extract) a wisdom tooth. The procedure often can be done in the dentist's or surgeon's office. You may have the surgery in the hospital, especially if you are having all your wisdom teeth pulled at one time or if you are at high risk for complications.
What To Expect After Surgery. Read more
Flap Surgery

There are a variety of treatments for gum disease depending on the stage of disease, how you may have responded to earlier treatments, and your overall health.

Treatments range from non-surgical therapies that control bacterial growth to surgery to restore supportive tissues.

Are there non-surgical Treatments for Gum Disease? Read more

Flossing
Dentists have been saying it for years, but now there's new evidence that brushing your teeth may not be enough to fight gum disease.

A study of twins shows flossing twice a day in addition to brushing reduced gum bleeding --a sign of gum disease -- by about 40% more than brushing alone in just two weeks.
Quick Results From Daily Flossing Read more
Fluoride
Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in many foods and water. Every day, minerals are added to and lost from a tooth's enamel layer through two processes, demineralization and remineralization. Minerals are lost (demineralization) from a tooth's enamel layer when acids -- formed from plaque bacteria and sugars in the mouth -- attack the enamel.
In What Forms Is Fluoride Available? Read more
Gum Disease
Gingivitis, also generally called gum disease or periodontal disease, begins with bacterial growth in your mouth and may end — if not properly treated — with tooth loss due to destruction of the tissue that surrounds your teeth.
What's the Difference Between Gingivitis and Periodontitis? Read more
Impacted Teeth
A number of conditions may require oral surgery, including: Impacted Teeth
Learn More About These Conditions. Read more
Implants
Despite improvements in dental care, millions of Americans suffer tooth loss -- mostly due to tooth decay, gingivitis (gum disease), or injury. For many years, the only treatment options available for people with missing teeth were bridges and dentures. But, today, dental implants are available.
What Are Dental Implants? Read more
TMD
Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) occur as a result of problems with the jaw, jaw joint, and surrounding facial muscles that control chewing and moving the jaw. These disorders are often incorrectly called TMJ, which stands for temporomandibular joint.
What Is the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ)? Read more
Lasers
Lasers have been used in dentistry since 1994 to treat a number of dental problems. Yet, despite FDA approval, no laser system has received the American Dental Association's (ADA) Seal of Acceptance. That seal assures dentists that the product or device meets ADA standards of safety and efficacy, among other things.
Still, some dentists are using lasers to treat: Read more
Plaque
Plaque is the sticky, colorless film of bacteria that forms on teeth. It makes teeth "feel fuzzy" to the tongue and is most noticeable when teeth are not brushed.
What Causes Plaque and Why Is It Harmful? Read more
Scaling and Root Planing
Root planing and scaling is one of the most effective ways to treat gum disease before it becomes severe. Root planing and scaling cleans between the gums and the teeth down to the roots. Your dentist may need to use a local anesthetic to numb your gums and the roots of your teeth.
What To Expect After Treatment? Read more
Sealants
Dental sealant is a thin, plastic coating painted on the chewing surfaces of teeth -- usually the back teeth (the premolars and molars) -- to prevent tooth decay. The sealant quickly bonds into the depressions and grooves of the teeth, forming a protective shield over the enamel of each tooth.
Who Should Get Sealants? Read more
Sensitive Teeth
Tooth sensitivity is tooth discomfort in one or more teeth that’s triggered by hot, cold, sweet, or sour foods and drinks, or even by breathing cold air. The pain can be sharp and sudden and can shoot deep into the nerve endings of your teeth.
What Causes Sensitive Teeth? Read more
Tooth Decay
Tooth decay is the destruction of tooth structure and can affect both the enamel (the outer coating of the tooth) and the dentin layer of the tooth.

Tooth decay occurs when foods containing carbohydrates (sugars and starches), such as bread, cereals, milk, soda, fruits, cakes, or candy are left on the teeth.
To prevent tooth decay: Read more